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Images of man and death / Philippe Ariès ; translated by Janet Lloyd.

By: Ariès, Philippe
Material type: TextTextCambridge, MA; London : Harvard University Press, [1985]Description: 271 pages ; illustrations ; 31 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 0674444108Uniform titles: Images de l'homme devant la mort. English Subject(s): Death | Death in art | Sepulchral monuments | Christian art and symbolism | Art -- Themes, motives | Civilization, WesternLOC classification: N8217.D5 A713 1985
Contents:
Introduction: Death and the icon. 1 The cemetery and the church. 2 Tombs. 3 From the home to the grave. 4 The beyond. 5 Omnia vanitas. 6 The return of the cemetery. 7 The death of others. 8 What of today?
Abstract: 'Conceived as an "imaginary film," this book is a visual presentation of how individuals and society have reshaped their images of death to meet the prevailing beliefs and social realities of dying...Through Ari�s's eye we come to interpret the real and symbolic items that have expressed our ambiguity in confronting the end of life: the epitaph, the deathbed scene, the recumbent statue that may represent the living person or the corpse, a figure in prayer. He examines ceremonies and rituals; visions of purgatory, life after death, and reincarnation; romantic yerning and the temptation of self-annihilation.'
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Over/AR.Ari (Browse shelf) 1 Available Oversized B00242

Translation of: Images de l'homme devant la mort.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-270).

Introduction: Death and the icon. 1 The cemetery and the church. 2 Tombs. 3 From the home to the grave. 4 The beyond. 5 Omnia vanitas. 6 The return of the cemetery. 7 The death of others. 8 What of today?

'Conceived as an "imaginary film," this book is a visual presentation of how individuals and society have reshaped their images of death to meet the prevailing beliefs and social realities of dying...Through Ari�s's eye we come to interpret the real and symbolic items that have expressed our ambiguity in confronting the end of life: the epitaph, the deathbed scene, the recumbent statue that may represent the living person or the corpse, a figure in prayer. He examines ceremonies and rituals; visions of purgatory, life after death, and reincarnation; romantic yerning and the temptation of self-annihilation.'

Hardcover

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