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The poetics of space / Gaston Bachelard ; translated from the French by Maria Jolas ; with a new foreword by John R. Stilgoe.

By: Bachelard, Gaston, 1884-1962
Contributor(s): Jolas, M
Material type: TextTextBoston : Beacon Press, 1994Description: xxxix, 241 pages ; 21 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 0807064734Uniform titles: Poétique de l'espace. English Subject(s): Space and time | Imagination | Poetry | SpaceLOC classification: B2430.B253 P6313 1994Online resources: Publisher description
Contents:
Foreword to the 1994 edition. -- Foreword to the 1964 edition. -- 1 The house, from cellar to garret. The significance of the hut. -- 2 House and universe. -- 3 Drawers, chests and wardrobes. -- 4 Nests. -- 5 Shells. -- 6 Corners. -- 7 Miniature. -- 8 Intimate immensity. -- 9 The dialectics of outside and inside. -- 10 The phenomenology of roundness
Abstract: 'In poetry and in folktale, in modern psychology and modern ornithology, Bachelard finds the bits and pieces of evidence he weaves into his argument that the house is a nest for dreaming, a shelter for imagining. Beyond his startling, unsettling illuminations of criminal cellars and raisin-smelling cabinets, his insistence that people need houses in order to dream, in order to imagine, remains one of the most unnerving, most convincing arguments in Western philosophy.' -- Foreword to the 1994 ed.
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Foreword to the 1994 edition. -- Foreword to the 1964 edition. -- 1 The house, from cellar to garret. The significance of the hut. -- 2 House and universe. -- 3 Drawers, chests and wardrobes. -- 4 Nests. -- 5 Shells. -- 6 Corners. -- 7 Miniature. -- 8 Intimate immensity. -- 9 The dialectics of outside and inside. -- 10 The phenomenology of roundness

'In poetry and in folktale, in modern psychology and modern ornithology, Bachelard finds the bits and pieces of evidence he weaves into his argument that the house is a nest for dreaming, a shelter for imagining. Beyond his startling, unsettling illuminations of criminal cellars and raisin-smelling cabinets, his insistence that people need houses in order to dream, in order to imagine, remains one of the most unnerving, most convincing arguments in Western philosophy.' -- Foreword to the 1994 ed.

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