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Returning words to flesh : feminism, psychoanalysis, and the resurrection of the body

By: Goldenberg, Naomi R
Material type: TextTextBoston Beacon Press c1990Description: viii, 255p.; bibliog. refs.; bibliog.; indexContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 0807067385Subject(s): Psychology and feminism | Psychology and religion | Mind and body | Jung, C.G. (Carl Gustav) 1875-1961 | Brown, Norman Oliver, 1913-2002 | Sports | Psychoanalysis and feminism | Hillman, James | Archetype (Psychology)LOC classification: BF175.4.F45 G64 1990
Contents:
1 Apocalypse in everyday life: the cultural context in which we do theory. Part 1 - Readings in body language (mostly male). 2 Reviewing a mentor: the concept of body in the work of Norman O. Brown. 3 On hockey sticks and hopscotch patsies: reflections on the sexuality of sport. 4 The tribe and I: thoughts on identity from a Jewish feminist atheist. Part 2 - Escape from Jung: psychoanalytic/feminist critiques. 5 Archetypal theory and the separation of mind and body: reason enough to turn to Freud?. 6 A critical view of archetypal thinking. 7 Body and psyche in the work of James Hillman. 8 Looking at Jung looking at himself: a psychoanalytic rereading of Memories, Dreams, Reflections. Part 3 - Feminism and psychoanalysis: overlaps and interludes. 9 "The same stuff": the talking cure of feminism and psychoanalysis. 10 Anger in the body: the impact of idealization on human development and religion. 11 The body of knowledge: religious notions in the convergence of psychoanalysis and feminism. 12 The return of the goddess: psychoanalytic reflections on the shift from theology to thealogy
Abstract: 'We live in a world from which people are disappearing. In our increasingly isolated daily lives, occasions for contact with one another are diminishing, as we rely more and more on technology for everything from food to sex and entertainment. Our dominant cultural theories support this quiet purge of human beings by stressing pure thought and transcendent spirit, and by celebrating images of people as mechanisms....Goldenberg argues that this emptiness...derives from our culture's rejection of the body....Devaluing the body, she says, has impoverished both our thinking and our everyday lives. The need to recognize and restore the presence of real human bodies to contemporary thought is traced in a series of essays, written with elegance and refreshing honesty. Goldenberg explores the dehumanizing force of technology, the sexual comedy of sports, the anti-body, anti-woman stance of traditional religions, C.G. Jung's blindness to his painful childhood, and the limits and dangers of Jungian thought and theory....'. Conclusion
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1 Apocalypse in everyday life: the cultural context in which we do theory. Part 1 - Readings in body language (mostly male). 2 Reviewing a mentor: the concept of body in the work of Norman O. Brown. 3 On hockey sticks and hopscotch patsies: reflections on the sexuality of sport. 4 The tribe and I: thoughts on identity from a Jewish feminist atheist. Part 2 - Escape from Jung: psychoanalytic/feminist critiques. 5 Archetypal theory and the separation of mind and body: reason enough to turn to Freud?. 6 A critical view of archetypal thinking. 7 Body and psyche in the work of James Hillman. 8 Looking at Jung looking at himself: a psychoanalytic rereading of Memories, Dreams, Reflections. Part 3 - Feminism and psychoanalysis: overlaps and interludes. 9 "The same stuff": the talking cure of feminism and psychoanalysis. 10 Anger in the body: the impact of idealization on human development and religion. 11 The body of knowledge: religious notions in the convergence of psychoanalysis and feminism. 12 The return of the goddess: psychoanalytic reflections on the shift from theology to thealogy

'We live in a world from which people are disappearing. In our increasingly isolated daily lives, occasions for contact with one another are diminishing, as we rely more and more on technology for everything from food to sex and entertainment. Our dominant cultural theories support this quiet purge of human beings by stressing pure thought and transcendent spirit, and by celebrating images of people as mechanisms....Goldenberg argues that this emptiness...derives from our culture's rejection of the body....Devaluing the body, she says, has impoverished both our thinking and our everyday lives. The need to recognize and restore the presence of real human bodies to contemporary thought is traced in a series of essays, written with elegance and refreshing honesty. Goldenberg explores the dehumanizing force of technology, the sexual comedy of sports, the anti-body, anti-woman stance of traditional religions, C.G. Jung's blindness to his painful childhood, and the limits and dangers of Jungian thought and theory....'. Conclusion

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