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On images : Far Eastern ways of thinking.

By: Izutsu, Toshihiko, 1914-
Contributor(s): Wilhelm, Hellmut, 1905-
Material type: TextTextSeries: (Eranos lectures: 7)Dallas, TX Spring Publications Edition: 1st Spring Publications printing 1988Description: 67p.; ill.; bibliogContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 0882144073Subject(s): Image (Theology) | Yi jing | Taoism | Zen Buddhism | Eranos ConferenceLOC classification: PL2464.Z9 I426 1988
Contents:
Between image and no-image - Toshihiko Izutsu (c1981). The interplay of image and concept in the Book of changes - Hellmut Wilhelm (c1968)
Abstract: The first lecture 'reflects on how "no-image" (non-being, nothingness) originates images...characterizes the different relations between no-image and images in three major traditions of the Far East: the I Ching, Classical Taoism, and Zen Buddhism....articulates a theory of consciousness...". The second 'considers the multiple and changing relations between image and concept in the I Ching....gives examples of images in that book from various sources....'
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'"Between image and no-image" was a lecture presented originally at the 1979 Eranos Conference in Ascona, Switzerland, and appeared in the Eranos Yearbook 48-1079, pp. 427-61. "The interplay of image and concept..." was a lecture presented originally at the 1967 Eranos Conference in Ascona, Switzerland, and appeared in the Eranos Yearbook 36-1967, pp. 31-57.

Between image and no-image - Toshihiko Izutsu (c1981). The interplay of image and concept in the Book of changes - Hellmut Wilhelm (c1968)

The first lecture 'reflects on how "no-image" (non-being, nothingness) originates images...characterizes the different relations between no-image and images in three major traditions of the Far East: the I Ching, Classical Taoism, and Zen Buddhism....articulates a theory of consciousness...". The second 'considers the multiple and changing relations between image and concept in the I Ching....gives examples of images in that book from various sources....'

Paperback (Katerbound)

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