Max and Lore Zeller Library Catalog
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Jung on death and immortality

By: Jung, C.G. (Carl Gustav) 1875-1961
Material type: TextTextSeries: (Encountering Jung)Princeton, NJ Princeton University Press c1999Description: 168p.; ill.; bibliog. refs.; indexContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 069100675XSubject(s): Psychoanalysis and religion | Death | Immortality | Jungian psychology | Jung, C.G. (Carl Gustav) 1875-1961LOC classification: BF175.4.R44 J86 1999
Contents:
The soul and death". "Psychological commentary on The Tibetan Book of the Dead". "Concerning rebirth". Letter to Pastor Fritz Pfafflin. "The psychology of the transference". Letter to Kristine Mann. "On resurrection". Letter to Margaret Erwin Schevill. Letter to Arnim Haemmerli. "On life after death". Letter to Anonymous. Letter to Anonymous
Abstract: 'Here collected for the first time are Jung's views on death and immortality, his writings often coinciding with the death of the most significant people in his life. The book shows many of the major themes running throughout the writings, including the relativity of space and time surrounding death, the link between transference and death, and the archetypes shared among the world's religions at the depths of the Self.'
List(s) this item appears in: Introduction to Jungian Psychology Concepts | Old Age / Death
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Zeller Library
Pj.Jun (Browse shelf) 1 Available B01432

Selected and introduced by Jenny Yates.

The soul and death". "Psychological commentary on The Tibetan Book of the Dead". "Concerning rebirth". Letter to Pastor Fritz Pfafflin. "The psychology of the transference". Letter to Kristine Mann. "On resurrection". Letter to Margaret Erwin Schevill. Letter to Arnim Haemmerli. "On life after death". Letter to Anonymous. Letter to Anonymous

'Here collected for the first time are Jung's views on death and immortality, his writings often coinciding with the death of the most significant people in his life. The book shows many of the major themes running throughout the writings, including the relativity of space and time surrounding death, the link between transference and death, and the archetypes shared among the world's religions at the depths of the Self.'

Paperback

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
CG Jung Institute or Los Angeles Logo