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The adolescent psyche; Jungian and Winnicottian perspectives

By: Frankel, Richard 1961-
Material type: TextTextLondon/New York Routledge c1998Description: xvi, 243p.; illus.; bibliog. notes; bibliog.; indexContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 0-415-16799-XSubject(s): Child Psychotherapy | Adolescent Psychotherapy | Jungian Psychology | Puer Aeternus | Senex Archetype | Transference and Countertransference | Initiation Archetype | Winnicott, D.W (Donald Woods), 1896-1971
Contents:
Part One: Theoretical perspectives on adolescence. 1. Psychoanalytic approaches. 2. Developmental analytical approaches. Part Two: Adolescence, initiation, and the dying process. 3. The archetype of initiation. 4. Life and death imagery in adolescence. 5. Bodily, idealistic and ideational awakenings. Part Three: Jung and adolescence: a new synthesis. 6. The individuation tasks of adolescence. 7. Persona and shadow in adolescence. 8. The development of conscience. Part Five: Adolescent psychology: shifting the paradigm. 9. Countertransference in the treatment of adolescence. 10. Prohibition and inhibition: clinical considerations. 11. Prohibition and inhibition: cultural dimension
Abstract: Frankel builds on the archetypal theories of Jung and the insights of Winnicott to rework the psychological approach to adolescence in a post-Jungian manner.
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Foreword by Mary Watkins.

Part One: Theoretical perspectives on adolescence. 1. Psychoanalytic approaches. 2. Developmental analytical approaches. Part Two: Adolescence, initiation, and the dying process. 3. The archetype of initiation. 4. Life and death imagery in adolescence. 5. Bodily, idealistic and ideational awakenings. Part Three: Jung and adolescence: a new synthesis. 6. The individuation tasks of adolescence. 7. Persona and shadow in adolescence. 8. The development of conscience. Part Five: Adolescent psychology: shifting the paradigm. 9. Countertransference in the treatment of adolescence. 10. Prohibition and inhibition: clinical considerations. 11. Prohibition and inhibition: cultural dimension

Frankel builds on the archetypal theories of Jung and the insights of Winnicott to rework the psychological approach to adolescence in a post-Jungian manner.

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