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Sacred geometry : philosophy and practice

By: Lawlor, Robert
Contributor(s): Lindisfarne Association
Material type: TextTextSeries: (The Illustrated library of sacred imagination)New York Crossroad c1982Description: 111p.; ill. (some col.); bibliogContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 0824500679Subject(s): Geometry | ProportionLOC classification: QA447 .L38 1982
Contents:
The practice of geometry. Sacred geometry: metaphor of universal order. The primal act: the division of unity. Alternation. Proportion and the golden section. Gnomonic expansion and the creation of spirals. The squaring of the circle. Mediation: geometry becomes music. Anthropos. The genesis of cosmic volumes
Abstract: 'This is an introduction to the geometry which, as the ancients taught and modern science now confirms, underlies the structure of the universe. The thinkers of Egypt, Greece and India recognized a long time ago that simple whole numbers and the elusive, irrational ones governed much of what they saw in their world and hence provided an approach to the Divine that had created it.'
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Originated in a series of seminars held in New York City for the Lindisfarne Association, Crestone, Colorado.". Diagrams by Melvyn Bernstein

The practice of geometry. Sacred geometry: metaphor of universal order. The primal act: the division of unity. Alternation. Proportion and the golden section. Gnomonic expansion and the creation of spirals. The squaring of the circle. Mediation: geometry becomes music. Anthropos. The genesis of cosmic volumes

'This is an introduction to the geometry which, as the ancients taught and modern science now confirms, underlies the structure of the universe. The thinkers of Egypt, Greece and India recognized a long time ago that simple whole numbers and the elusive, irrational ones governed much of what they saw in their world and hence provided an approach to the Divine that had created it.'

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