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The experiences of Tiresias : the feminine and the Greek man

By: Loraux, Nicole
Material type: TextTextPrinceton, NJ Princeton University Press c1995Description: viii, 348p.; bibliog.; glossary; indexContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volume ISBN: 0691017174Subject(s): Greece | Civilization | History | Sex role | Femininity | Masculinity (Psychology)
Contents:
Introduction - The feminine operator. Part 1 - Women, men, and affliction. 1 Bed and war. 2 Ponos: some difficulties regarding the term for "labor". Part 2 - The weaknesses of strength. 3 The Spartans' "beautiful death". 4 The warrior's fear and trembling. 5 The wounds of virility. 6 The strangled body. 7 Herakles: the supermale and the feminine. Part 3 - Socrates is a man (philosophical interlude). 8 Therefore, Socrates is immortal. 9 Socrates, Plato, Herakles: a heroic paradigm of the philosopher. Part 4 - What woman?. 10 And the mothers' case dismissed. 11 The phantom of sexuality. 12 What Tiresias saw. Conclusion - Feminine nature in history
Abstract: '...explores the ambivalence in how the Greek male defines himself in relationship to the feminine. In these essays, Loraux disturbes the idea of virile men and feminine women, a distinction found in official discourse and aimed at protecting the ideals of male identity from any taint of the feminine. Turning to epic and to Socrates, however, she insists on a logic of an inclusiveness between the genders....'
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Transl. by Paula Wissing.

Introduction - The feminine operator. Part 1 - Women, men, and affliction. 1 Bed and war. 2 Ponos: some difficulties regarding the term for "labor". Part 2 - The weaknesses of strength. 3 The Spartans' "beautiful death". 4 The warrior's fear and trembling. 5 The wounds of virility. 6 The strangled body. 7 Herakles: the supermale and the feminine. Part 3 - Socrates is a man (philosophical interlude). 8 Therefore, Socrates is immortal. 9 Socrates, Plato, Herakles: a heroic paradigm of the philosopher. Part 4 - What woman?. 10 And the mothers' case dismissed. 11 The phantom of sexuality. 12 What Tiresias saw. Conclusion - Feminine nature in history

'...explores the ambivalence in how the Greek male defines himself in relationship to the feminine. In these essays, Loraux disturbes the idea of virile men and feminine women, a distinction found in official discourse and aimed at protecting the ideals of male identity from any taint of the feminine. Turning to epic and to Socrates, however, she insists on a logic of an inclusiveness between the genders....'

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